DOPA in the House

Remember when I wrote back in May about “DOPA(Deleting Online Predators Act)”:http://www.libraryplanet.com/2006/05/13/dopa? Guess what?
bq.Web sites like Amazon.com and MySpace.com may soon be inaccessible for many people using public terminals at American schools and libraries, thanks to the U.S. House of Representatives. By a 410-15 vote on Thursday, politicians approved a bill that would effectively require that “chat rooms” and “social networking sites” be rendered inaccessible to minors, an age group that includes some of the Internet’s most ardent users. Adults can ask for permission to access the sites. – “Declan McCullagh(Chat rooms could face expulsion)”:http://news.com.com/2100-1028_3-6099414.html?part=rss&tag=6099414&subj=news So what does this mean for libraries and our patrons?
bq.The Internet is changing how we live, learn, work, and interact with one another. If today’s young people are to succeed in the workplace of the future, they must learn information literacy skills for the technologies of today and tomorrow. Libraries are far and away the best places to learn these skills, and social networking sites, which introduce kids to the world of online interaction, are key to successful development in that field. – “Beth Yoke(DOPA testimony)”:http://www.ala.org/ala/washoff/WOissues/techinttele/DOPA_testimony.pdf Of course, this means that if the Senate passes the bill, we will soon be blocking access to notorious sites like “LISNews(Bill Mandates Libraries & Schools Block MySpace)”:http://politics.lisnews.org/Politics/06/07/28/1316207.shtml which is one of those social networking sites that allows for profiles and user-generated content. And if this becomes a law, this definitely proves “the ties(The Age of Murdoch)”:http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/prem/200309/fallows between News Corp (the owner of MySpace) and the Administration are somewhat overestimated.