Libraries and Obsolescence

bq.Libraries are obsolete. Modern information technology involves two-way communication between providers and users of information technology. With instant messaging, blogs, message boards, and email, the Internet fosters information sharing among virtually unlimited numbers of information providers. Computers are communication devices that bring communities together.

Patrons, Users and Customers

Last week I attended a workshop where the speaker made some remark about how some libraries still call those who frequent them “patrons.” She thought they were being stuffy and old-fashioned. She preferred users or customers.
bq.First, calling people “users” is pernicious.

Info Island

A lot of things have been happening at the Second Life Library of late. First off, the group now has an island. Info Island will be home to the library and various related projects. Corporate sponsorship has been secured for at least the next year and if the project continues to be as successful as I think it will be, many more years to come.

Information Science and Librarians

Has it been over a year already since Michael Gorman launched an “attack on Blogging(Michael Gorman)”:http://www.libraryplanet.com/2005/02/25/gorman?
bq.If you believe, as I do, that there is a crisis in library education that threatens the very existence of libraries and librarianship, you are likely to draw a negative reaction from a variety of people.

Finding on the Shelf

bq.Are we really keeping our “collections organized so that [our] users can easily locate the resources they need”? Perhaps very large facilities can justify Dewey. But does Dewey classification best serve buildings under thirty or forty-thousand square feet? – “Michael Casey(Spine Labels and De-Dewefication)”:http://www.librarycrunch.com/2006/05/spine_labels_and_dedeweficatio.html At FLA, one of the library consultants was showing off photographs of a library that had really nice bookstore display units which are optimized for browsers.

Let me entertain you!

I didn’t get a chance to write the post about what bothered me about the “Library 2.0 Gang(The Library 2.0 Gang)”:http://www.libraryplanet.com/2006/02/21/gang yesterday because I spent the entire day at a MARC21 workshop. But since the handout has a quote that fits my points perfectly, I am going to borrow it.

The Library 2.0 Gang

Forget the “Capital Gang(CNN breaks up Capital Gang)”:http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr/television/brief_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1000967495! The “Gillmor Gang(Gillmor Gang)”:http://gillmorgang.podshow.com/ is so 2005! The discussion roundtable you need to be listening to is the “Library 2.0 Gang(Introducing the Library 2.0 Gang)”:http://talk.talis.com/archives/2006/02/introducing_the.html. Their first conversation was a highly charged conversation about what Library 2.0 means.

Knowing When to Hold Them

The following is an exchange that took place on the Polaris mailing list. The names have been withheld to protect the innocent.
bq.[Withheld] is preparing to allow our patrons to access their accounts, place holds, etc., remotely. We were under the impression that, if set up correctly in sysadmin, it would be impossible to place a hold on an item with a status of ‘in’.

Preparing for the Future

What we have done right:
bq.Public libraries feel their mission has in many ways been transformed by new technologies, particularly Internet access, and that the key to winning greater support for public libraries is educating the public in the use of these technologies.