TextDrive vs. Textpattern

Once upon a time, TextDrive was started with a certain idea in mind.
bq.TextDrive was founded in 2004 by Dean Allen, and was originally conceived as a managed hosting service for users of his Textpattern content-management system. In an unusual move, Allen offered lifetime hosting accounts, at a one-time price of USD$199, to the first two hundred customers in lieu of seeking venture capital; this initial group was dubbed the “VC 200”.

Movable Type vs. WordPress

bq.Movable Type 3.0 and on will not be the solution for everyone, and that’s okay. For some users, TypePad makes more sense. For others, non-Six Apart tools make more sense. – “Mena Trott(Another CMS)”:http://www.libraryplanet.com/2004/05/15/cms Many of us at the time and many more since have made the choice to use “non-Six Apart tools.” Six Apart is “making an effort(we’re here to compete)”:http://sippey.typepad.com/filtered/2008/03/were-here-to-co.html to change that.

Distribution Costs and the Long Tail

bq.In lieu of more flexibility on pricing, NBC U sought a cut of Apple’s hardware sales. “Apple sold millions of dollars worth of hardware off the back of our content, and made a lot of money,” Zucker said. “They did not want to share in what they were making off the hardware or allow us to adjust pricing.” NBC Universal programming accounted for 40% of iTunes’ video sales.

NBC v. Apple

One questions that arose the other day in the Apple-NBC Kerfluffle was the demand that NBC wanted more copy protection.
bq.NBC Universal also wants iTunes to stiffen anti-piracy provisions so computer users would not have easy access to illegal downloads. – “Associated Press(Apple, Striking Back, Bars NBC Sales on ITunes)”:http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/technology/apee-apple.html?ex=1346212800&en=055f0bc7f6bdc4fb&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss Most people were quite what that meant.

Gnomedex 2007

Well, here I am again, back at Gnomedex for a second year. I am really looking forward to learning a great deal over the next couple of days. One difference from last year, though, is I am not going to write a post for every session.

Cult of the Amateur

I just finished reading Andrew Keen’s “Cult of the Amateur(Cult of the Amateur)”:http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0385520808/ref=nosim/libraryplanetcom. I had heard it discussed on more than one podcast, so I had been looking forward to reading it. It was pretty much what I expected. Keen holds a “Michael Gorman-esque(Gorman on Web 2.0)”:http://www.libraryplanet.com/2007/06/13/gorman-on-web-20 view of the world, in that the only choices that matter are made by book publishers, newspapers editors, and record producers.

Longing for Library 1.0

While it hasn’t always been embraced by everyone, I think most people are willing to either give Library 2.0 a chance or just ignore it. Unfortunately, the “Editorial Staff of the Tampa Tribune(Mission Creep In Library System Deserves Fresh, Closer Look)”:http://www2.tbo.com/content/2007/jul/29/bz-mission-creep-in-library-system-deserves-fresh-/?news-opinion-editorials don’t fit into those categories.

Florida Quality of Life

As I wrote about a few months ago, the State Legislature of Florida decided to force reductions of county budgets across the state. Our own county has reduced their budget by 3% from previous year. This has caused a great deal of discussion about which departments are essential and which are quality of life.

The New NannyState

Apparently, some members of Congress were so impressed by John Edward’s “fictional campaign pledge(John Edwards Vows To End All Bad Things By 2011)”:http://www.theonion.com/content/news/john_edwards_vows_to_end_all_bad, that they are going ahead and planning to enact the measures now. The House of Representatives is going to focus on file-sharing.